RB Racing Rake and Trail Calculator.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Motorcycle Rake Kit. My Design was the first bolt on rake kit on the motorcycle market. This was the first bolt on kit which modifies the frames steering head angle and the fork angle independently, which allows setting the rake and trail to any number the designer chooses given a particular wheel size. This design was produced for many motorcycles including Honda VTX1800, Honda VTX1300, many.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

The combination of motorcycle rake and trail is a critical success factor to your motorcycle's rideability. Every single degree of inclination can change the way your motorcycle handles. Rake. Rake (the angle of inclination) is a term used to describe the angular relation between the head tube of the bike and an imaginary vertical line, drawn from the point where the head tube connects to the.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Trail is a function of steering axis angle, fork offset, and wheel size. Motorcyclists tend to speak of trail in relation to rake angle. The larger the rake angle the larger the trail. A rake is an angle of slope( and for motorcycle is measured from the vertical.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts. searching for Rake angle 20 found (34 total) alternate case: rake angle. Bicycle and motorcycle geometry (2,379 words) exact match in snippet view article find links to article speak of trail in relation to rake angle. The larger the rake angle the larger the trail.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Rake, which is sometimes referred to as steering head inclination, steering head angle or steering axis inclination, is defined as the rearward inclination of the steering head as measured from the vertical. Rake is always described in degrees. Although there are exceptions, the accepted practice is to consider a vertical steering head; one placed at 90-degrees to the pavement, as having a.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Rake (also called caster) is the angle of a motorcycle’s steering head of the frame (A). Choppers have a lot of rake—their forks stick way out in front. Super bikes have much less astheir forks are closer to vertical. A typical sportbike might have a rake as steep as 25 degrees, while a chopper may be closer to 45 degrees. A touring bike is typically at around 29 degrees and a cruiser at.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

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What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Rake-- The angle in degrees of the steering neck from the vertical. Fork Length-- The distance between the top of the fork tubes to the centerline of the axle. Diameter of the front tire. Diameter of the rear tire. Trail: Distance defined by vertical line from axle to ground and intersect of centerline of steering neck and ground. Raked Triple Trees-- In order to bring trail figures back into.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Rake is the angle the neck’s headstock tube is set at. Measured in degrees, the number normally ranges from the low 20s (usually sport bikes) to measurements in the mid-30s on production motorcycles. A 2017 Suzuki GSX-R1000, for instance, sports a 23.2-degree fork angle, whereas a Harley-Davidson Softail Breakout made the same model year kicks the front wheel all the way out to 35 degrees.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Once you get past a certain point with extending, however it becomes necessary to rake the neck, if only to keep your feet on the ground when you pull up to a light. Of course, the raked neck also adds much to the appearance of the bike.

What is rake angle on a motorcycle

Bikers can get this kind of look by adjusting the rake of the bike. The rake is the angle formed between the neck on the frame of a bike and a vertical line. The bigger the angle, the further out the front wheel will be from the frame. The distance between the point where the tire makes contact with the ground and a vertical line from the center of the front wheel's steering axis to the ground.